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24/08/2012 15:48 | By Adam Hartley, contributor, MSN Tech & Gadgets
MSN Tech-spert: The Week In Tech - 24 August

Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm



Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm. (© jpl.nasa.gov)
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Everyclick and tech charity pioneer Give As You Live founder Polly Gowers OBE reveals the big tech and gadget hits and misses of the week.

Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm

Nasa's Mars rover has taken another small step for robot-kind this week, with Nasa engineers at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California claiming that the rover Curiosity flexed its robotic arm for the first time since before its November launch. Curiosity was given a full health-check by his Nasa creators this week, with the engineers testing out the seven-foot long arm, that also includes a drill, a scoop, a camera and a spectrometer.

Polly says, somewhat dismissively: "I'm glad that the press release itself has said that this is a "small step" - so I'm not the one tempted to make the bad jokes. Nasa's 2.8 million Twitter followers and those following the news in other social and traditional media, are seeing just how well a story can be built - next up, I want to know how the test drive went."

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MSN Tech-spert: The Week In Tech - 24 AugustEveryclick and tech charity pioneer Give As You Live founder Polly Gowers OBE reveals the big tech and gadget hits and misses of the week.Adam Hartleycontributor, MSN Tech & Gadgets2012-08-24T14:48:41true251005052The new MIcrosoft logo seen inside the Boston Microsoft store. Image PAMicrosoft unveils first new logo in 25 yearsArticle250997936Intel mobile computer(©AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)Prototype tech favourites in their earliest formsGallery251015928Rescue Run(©St John’s Ambulance)How to not waste time on FacebookGalleryMars Rover flexes its robotic armEveryclick and tech charity pioneer Give As You Live founder Polly Gowers OBE reveals the big tech and gadget hits and misses of the week.Mars Rover flexes its robotic armNasa's Mars rover has taken another small step for robot-kind this week, with Nasa engineers at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California claiming that the rover Curiosity flexed its robotic arm for the first time since before its November launch. Curiosity was given a full health-check by his Nasa creators this week, with the engineers testing out the seven-foot long arm, that also includes a drill, a scoop, a camera and a spectrometer.Polly says, somewhat dismissively: "I'm glad that the press release itself has said that this is a "small step" - so I'm not the one tempted to make the bad jokes. Nasa's 2.8 million Twitter followers and those following the news in other social and traditional media, are seeing just how well a story can be built - next up, I want to know how the test drive went." topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Mars Rover flexes its robotic arm.(©jpl.nasa.gov)Logitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboard Logitech unveiled a new washable keyboard named the K310 this week, to a barrage of predictablejokes from the (male-dominated) technology media regarding various unspeakable acts that many men perform when left alone in front of the internet. Logitech's latest is a full size QWERTY keyboard for the PC that can be washed safely protecting against any spills.Polly says: "Perfect - this is the keyboard I need for my home. Our poor PC keyboard is close to being a health hazard after all of our family have shared snacks and drinks above it whilst on Facebook, checking email or drawing in Paint. If you're on the squeamish side, then our exiting keyboard is a definite no-go. If you have a similar sticky little fingers issue, you're probably delighted by this. A PR-able gimmick perhaps, but I wouldn't be surprised if sales of this were as healthy as the health benefits themselves."  topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Logitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardLogitech launches washable keyboardFacebook sued over Timeline featureFacebook sued over Timeline featureA Chinese web company is suing Facebook this month, claiming it "copied" its own Timeline feature. Cubic Network is a Pinterest-style start-up, founded four years ago which launched its Timeline feature - which shows videos and pictures in chronological order, much like Facebook's - back on February 9, 2008. The initiative was launched by Harvard graduate Xiong Wanli, who gave a talk at Stanford university outlining the new functionality. A talk attended by a certain Mark Zuckerberg, it so happens. The plot thickens...Polly says: "I do think it's important for small businesses to protect themselves from idea-snatchers. Everyone wants a slice of the Facebook pie and if Facebook is found guilty it'll mean a big pay-out for Cubic Network; if its not, the legal bills could be the death of the site." topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Facebook sued over Timeline feature(©Facebook/MSN)Workaholics obsessed with "bringing their own devices"Workaholics obsessed with "bringing their own devices" (BYOD)According to the latest quarterly Mobile Workforce report by mobility service iPass BYOD, that rather ugly acronym that stands for "bring your own device", is apparently creating an unhealthy growth in workaholics who cannot bear to be disconnected from the office and will check incoming emails from bosses, colleagues and clients 24/7. Funny that! So are you guilty of cluttering your desk at work with your own smartphone, tablet, netbook and various other tech and gadgets that you pull out of your handbag or man-bag every morning?Polly says: "This research doesn't surprise me at all. We live in an "always on" world. It's a very rare day that I don't answer my email. Before we went to Zanzibar in March, my husband hid all of my chargers before I packed - unknown to him I always have spares. So, to his dismay I spent an hour a day in searing heatseeking Wi-Fi zones so I could get my connection fix and check-in with the office. I am happy to admit to being a workaholic. I enjoy it - this is no crime. Once I was done I returned to the beautiful beach and another gin and tonic. With no Wi-Fi and no mobile network on the beach there was no guilt, and meant total relaxation. 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Thanks to a group of researchers in South Korea, this new tech, which uses a screen barrier withslats (instead of requiring everybody to wear specs) lets each of the viewers eyes see the image differently, thus creating 3D illusion of depth.Polly says: "Thank goodness for that. As I'm sure everyone agrees, those 3D glasses are not flattering. Next stop let's have sensory film experiences that overpower the stale popcorn aroma!" topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)Glasses-free 3D in cinemas(©Oakley)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'IT woes 'waste millions of hours' We've all experienced it. That nagging, frustrating, stressful feeling caused by your office computer or IT systems "going down" - usually on the same morning that you desperately need to hit that deadline for the most important report of the year! Workers are wasting millions of hours every day because of such problems with office computer systems, according to a new survey of more than 1,000 workers by IT firm Modis - with the report also noting the extra-annoying fact that most of us have quicker computers at home than we do in the office.Polly says: "Technology's goal is to make things easier and more efficient for us, but we all know that it isn't always the reality. It's a shame that an IT error can affect staff morale, but then maybe it's just something we have to accept in this modern day. In the past factory workers would put their limbs and life at risk to complete a job, now we just have to take a dip in morale, not that bad in comparison, is it?" topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V2IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)IT woes 'waste millions of hours'(©MSN)In Google’s Inner Circle, a falling number of womenIn Google's Inner Circle, a falling number of women Search giant Google hopes its famous algorithms can solve one of the most vexing problems facing Silicon Valley: how to recruit and retain more women. Google has generally been considered a place where women have thrived, but it wants to figure out how to compete even more vigorously for the relatively few women working in technology.Polly says: "As a woman in tech, I'm pleased to read about companies empowering women in to the tech sphere. But, please, who came up with the idea to develop an algorithm to find out the solution to the problem of why women were dropping out of the interview process? There may be a clue in the methods. 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That also means cutting off apps or services that compete with Twitter - particularly competing media experiences - or that pull more value out of Twitter than they put in.Polly says: "Some sneaky companies have been encroaching on Twitter's turf. Twitter played nicely for a while but then it went too far. Now, Twitter is cutting off its thirdparty extensions to make it more commercially viable from an advertising standpoint. If Google can change its technological goalposts to maintain the healthy bulge of the company's wallet, why can't Twitter? 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If 4G is as fast as it boasts to be and when new technologyincorporates the necessary radio microchips, my imaginary image of internet speed will need to change -- it will be Usain Bolt couriering my emails."  topThis field has been disabled for Gallery V24G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)4G mobile broadband(©Apple)